russell higgs

09 Oct 2006 1,524 views
 
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photoblog image monday 09102006

monday 09102006

The boy has undergone full callosal surgery, the two halves of his brain have been forever seperated from one another. His epileptic seizures have abated and the boy seems to have the same personality and abilities as he had before. But his left brain literally does not know what his right brain is thinking and vice versa.

The researcher, a neuroscientist, has an optical device that makes it possible to flash visual messages in such a way that a message reaches only one hemisphere of the boy's brain. Now the researcher flashes to the boy's right brain the command "walk." The boy accommodatingly pushes his chair back and starts to leave the testing area. The researcher asks the boy why he is doing this. This verbal inquiry is processed by the verbally dominant left hemisphere - the one that didn't get the command and doesn't know why the boy is getting up. But an answer is provided, a perfectly good reason: "Going into my house to get a Coke."

A key player in this is the left brain as INTERPRETER. It is the talker, the explainer, the maker of narrative meaning, the storyteller. And it appears to be quite capable of creating good stories on skimpy resources. It will use ANY MATERIAL available, and fill in the blanks whenever a little imagination is nescessary to make a story hold together.

This is especially noteworthy when we consider that MOST parts of the brain are NOT connected to the outer world, but are connected to other parts of the brain.

(edited from "REALITY ISN'T WHAT IT USED TO BE" by Walter Truett Anderson)

monday 09102006

The boy has undergone full callosal surgery, the two halves of his brain have been forever seperated from one another. His epileptic seizures have abated and the boy seems to have the same personality and abilities as he had before. But his left brain literally does not know what his right brain is thinking and vice versa.

The researcher, a neuroscientist, has an optical device that makes it possible to flash visual messages in such a way that a message reaches only one hemisphere of the boy's brain. Now the researcher flashes to the boy's right brain the command "walk." The boy accommodatingly pushes his chair back and starts to leave the testing area. The researcher asks the boy why he is doing this. This verbal inquiry is processed by the verbally dominant left hemisphere - the one that didn't get the command and doesn't know why the boy is getting up. But an answer is provided, a perfectly good reason: "Going into my house to get a Coke."

A key player in this is the left brain as INTERPRETER. It is the talker, the explainer, the maker of narrative meaning, the storyteller. And it appears to be quite capable of creating good stories on skimpy resources. It will use ANY MATERIAL available, and fill in the blanks whenever a little imagination is nescessary to make a story hold together.

This is especially noteworthy when we consider that MOST parts of the brain are NOT connected to the outer world, but are connected to other parts of the brain.

(edited from "REALITY ISN'T WHAT IT USED TO BE" by Walter Truett Anderson)

comments (7)

  • Suby
  • Milton Keynes, UK
  • 9 Oct 2006, 10:58
You just crack me up, where do you come up with these ideas?

Suby :d
russell higgs: the ideas kind of come up by themselves. I just try to not get in their way too much.
  • Mal
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 9 Oct 2006, 16:32
are the new extra lights hurting your eyes Russell? My Brain does not feel well connected to anything today!
russell higgs: it was a bugger trying to point the camera in the right direction. I kept chopping off one of my shoullders.
  • Shanti
  • Switzerland
  • 9 Oct 2006, 19:43
so russell.

i was thinking of you and your project this weekend. and i wondered if you would consider it a challenge to make a self-portrait without a mask, or would that be just another part of the same thing you already do?

i mean, if you were moved to tears, or angry, or really happy, could you take the picture? what about if you felt shy or uncomfortable? (does that ever happen?)

cuz you say "it is about not being blocked by unnecessary obstacles..." and well, aren't props and masks sort of unnecessary obstacles? don't get me wrong... i love your project and the amazing portraits appearing every day.

i just wondered. how real. how exposed. you seem so very present in these photos, you look right into the camera and feel very centered.

i guess i think you shouldn't end this series without at least one full cup of russell, just simple, no props. that's my 2 sense...

thanks,
shanti
It would be fine to see a poster with the whole serie ? smile
  • nev
  • Australia
  • 10 Oct 2006, 00:06
Russell it sounds like you need nipple mirrors so you can see what you taking a shot of. i like zebs idea. surely soon you will have enough for a page a day diary to sell on the high street. I thought at first you were ghost writing an arthur c clarke novel russell but walter anderson sounds like a big persons book, things i don't seem to read anymore.
  • Abi
  • United Kingdom
  • 13 Oct 2006, 11:53
martian invasion...or invasion of the potato bowl heads
  • Liam
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 13 Oct 2006, 15:35
I completely agree with Zebigleb.C'est un bon idee!
I'd buy your poster Russell.It'd make a great greeting card too.
Lx
russell higgs: thanks for the encouragement. for some reason i'm dragging my heels on this. there will be a cafe press online shopping page soon.

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